radon gas

Radon may be undetectable to human senses, but the gas is still around us so how dangerous is radon gas? Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. Radon gas is a naturally occurring radioactive gas found in rocks, soil, and water as a result of thorium and uranium breaking down. Trace amounts of radon are released into the air as those elements break down. Radon can then seep into homes built on natural soil through foundation cracks, slab joints, and the water supply. (more…)

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Ever since the fracking boom has taken off, some are concerned with the effects such a dramatic increase can lead to. One of those concerns is an increase in the levels of radon, which is a deadly gas that is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. Several studies on the subject have sought to find out whether a connection exists, specifically: does fracking increase radon gas risks? (more…)

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Radon is a gas emitted from soil or rocks that can enter into buildings through cracks in the floors or walls or in joints around pipes, wires or pumps. Every house is different, so each home has to be tested individually. Over the last few years research has linked radon gas exposure to blood cancer, specifically, in women. We have known for many years that radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer and that other health risks exist, so continued testing and monitoring has taken place. Links between exposure to radon and blood cancer in women have…

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Did you know that every year 21,000 deaths are related to radon gas? The unintentional inhalation of radon gas is now the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. The odorless, noxious gas can seep into a home from contaminated soil through foundations and other points of contact. Out of all the states in the country, Pennsylvania has one of the highest overall levels of radon gas. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection estimates that 40% of PA homes have radon gas levels above the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) guideline. The EPA strongly recommends taking action to…

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Summer is finally here and families with children are spending as much time doing fun outdoor activities together as possible. However, with the summer season comes hot weather that forces homeowners to close their windows and run air conditioning systems. That cool comfort is a relief, and essential when the temperatures rise too high, but in homes that have radon gas, the closed conditions can cause radon levels to rise dangerously, and thus increase radon gas concerns for homeowners. Radon gas is odorless, tasteless, and colorless, so homeowners can have radon gas in their homes without knowing. This radioactive gas…

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Radon Exposure is the Second Leading Cause of Lung Cancer in the United States Thanks to intensive public awareness campaigns, most Americans know that tobacco smoking is the single biggest cause of lung cancer in the country. Yet, what is less commonly known is how noxious the second-leading cause of lung cancer, radon gas exposure, is. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Surgeon General, radon causes more incidences of lung cancer among non-smokers than second-hand tobacco smoke; radon exposure causes an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year, of which nearly 3,000 are people who have never smoked.…

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Many homeowners plan winter renovations before spring, whether to enhance their own enjoyment of their homes, or to prepare to sell in the spring. Basements, which offer a host of possibilities for growing and active families, is often a top choice for updates. Renovating and finishing this subfloor area can significantly increase the size of the home, sometimes even doubling a building's usable space, and such a project can substantially increase the building's value. However, basements are prone to a few problems that homeowners should be aware of and test for before they begin renovation plans. One common issue in…

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