Lung Cancer

Radon Exposure is the Second Leading Cause of Lung Cancer in the United States Thanks to intensive public awareness campaigns, most Americans know that tobacco smoking is the single biggest cause of lung cancer in the country. Yet, what is less commonly known is how noxious the second-leading cause of lung cancer, radon gas exposure, is. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Surgeon General, radon causes more incidences of lung cancer among non-smokers than second-hand tobacco smoke; radon exposure causes an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year, of which nearly 3,000 are people who have never smoked.…

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Josh Knight, WHSV Radon Awareness Month.jpg Watch this WHSV news segment. Radon is something you can't see or smell but, you need to know about to keep your family safe. It's a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is likely in your home and specialists say one in three homes in the Valley have unsafe levels. The rocky soil in the area makes homes, businesses and apartment buildings more susceptible. The radon comes from decaying uranium and thorium, which exist naturally in the soil and rocks. Continuously breathing in unsafe levels of radon is the equivalent of smoking numerous cigarettes per…

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Kathleen E. Carey, The Delaware County Daily Times Delaware Countians at high risk of developing lung cancer may have recently gotten another lease on life. Thanks to Dr. Raymond J. Vivacqua, medical director of the Crozer Regional Cancer Center, and his participating partners, an evaluation procedure called the Family Lung Assessment Program, which is accessible to all people, offers free identification surveys and low-cost CAT scans for specific populations in jeopardy of developing lung cancer. “I’m hoping to reduce the number of people scanned so we target the people who need it,” Vivacqua said. Although the program has been in…

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National Association of Women in Health Care November is Lung Cancer Awareness month. Lung cancer kills more women than any other cancer – nearly 200 each day. Most die within a year of diagnosis. Yet lung cancer remains the “hidden” women’s cancer – little known and rarely discussed. It is the least funded cancer in terms of research dollars per death of all the major cancers. It’s one of the only cancers where patients are routinely blamed for causing their condition. But despite lung cancer’s strong association with tobacco use, one in five women who develop the disease has never…

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Casey Blake, Asheville Citizen-Times ASHEVILLE — Lung cancer doesn't have an iconic ribbon or well-known signature color. In fact, it doesn't even have its own support group in Western North Carolina. Yet lung cancer will take more lives this year than breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancers combined. November marks Lung Cancer Awareness Month, but as many area physicians, health workers and patients have noticed, awareness is in relatively short supply. But in even shorter supply for lung cancer patients is public empathy. In the wake of ‘Pink October's' flood of breast cancer awareness efforts, the elephant in the room…

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USA Weekend Almost a quarter of a million Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, and more will die from it than colon, breast and prostate cancers combined, the National Cancer Institute says. You know that if you smoke, you increase your risk of lung cancer — and, in fact, tobacco smoke causes nearly nine out of 10 cases. If you quit today, your lungs will begin to repair themselves in just two weeks; if you quit before age 50, your risk of dying in the next 15 years is cut in half. More ways to protect yourself:…

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Gardiner Harris, The New York Times WASHINGTON — Annual CT scans of current and former heavy smokers reduce the risk that they will die from lung cancer by 20 percent, a huge government-financed study has found. Even more surprising, the scans seemed to reduce their risk of death from other causes as well. The finding, announced by the National Cancer Institute on Thursday, represents a major advance in cancer detection that could potentially save thousands of lives annually, although at considerable expense. Lung cancer claims about 160,000 lives each year, more than the deaths from colorectal, breast, pancreatic and prostate…

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Cancer News Information Home sweet home, this American saying might not hold true anymore, especially in terms of health concerns with modern lifestyle. Some health hazards are present right in the comforts of your home. It’s critical to recognize them. Three major areas that involve cancer-causing substances (i.e. carcinogens) include: 1. Smoking and passive smoke 2. Radon gas 3. Personal care and household products Smoking is a primary risk factor of lung cancer. Also, smoking aggravates cardiovascular diseases and is causally linked with the development of cancer of the bladder, colon, pancreas, and upper digestive system. Individuals who smoke or…

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Valerie Caviglia and Michael Konopasek, Indiana's NewsCenter FORT WAYNE, Ind. (Indiana's NewsCenter) - For non-smokers in Fort Wayne, avoiding second-hand smoke inhalation has been an achievable goal since the implementation of the city's tough anti-smoking ordinance. But this is not the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers and many go unaware. Radon gas is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers and one of the greatest causes of lung cancer among all people, second only to smoking itself. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared the week of Oct. 17-24 National Radon Awareness Week. The EPA predicts Radon…

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Lynette Summerill, EmpowHER 1. Lung cancer affects women differently than men, and young women (under 40) are at greater risk for developing lung cancer than young men. 2. More women die of lung cancer than any other cancer, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer and uterine cancers combined. Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, so if you smoke, quit. 3. Your risk of lung cancer continues to decline with every year you don't smoke. However, if you used to smoke, you remain at increased risk for lung cancer for at least 20 years after you quit. 4. Radon is…

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