Test for radon with a DIY home kit

It’s easy to pretend that radon doesn’t exist because we can’t see it, taste it or smell it. To many homeowners, it’s “something that other people have to worry about,” and they think, “How bad can it really be?”

Well, according to the Environmental Protection Agency Web site, radon exposure is second only to smoking for causing lung cancer. And because it’s a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is the result of uranium decay found in nearly all soils, trapping it in confined spaces can be detrimental to the inhabitants.

The gas moves through the ground and into the air. Most often, radon penetrates a home through cracks in walls and solid floors and other holes in the foundation, such as gaps around service pipes. It doesn’t matter if a house is old or new, drafty or sealed. The gas gets trapped, and if the levels are concentrated enough, it can pose a health risk.