Testing Radon

Don Coleman, KJCT8 Invisible Gas is Second Leading Cause of Lung Cancer Watch this KJCT8 news segment. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. -- We have a warning for you about a lung cancer-causing gas that could be lurking inside your home. It's called Radon. The byproduct of decomposing Uranium deep below the earth's surface seeps up through the ground and can become trapped inside your home, especially during the winter. It's the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States right behind smoking. Experts say you should use a test kit to figure out your home's levels. And if they're high,…

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Josh Knight, WHSV Radon Awareness Month.jpg Watch this WHSV news segment. Radon is something you can't see or smell but, you need to know about to keep your family safe. It's a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is likely in your home and specialists say one in three homes in the Valley have unsafe levels. The rocky soil in the area makes homes, businesses and apartment buildings more susceptible. The radon comes from decaying uranium and thorium, which exist naturally in the soil and rocks. Continuously breathing in unsafe levels of radon is the equivalent of smoking numerous cigarettes per…

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U.S. EPA Radon exposure is the leading cause of non-smoking lung cancer WASHINGTON – January is National Radon Action Month and the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and eight other federal agencies are announcing a new effort to strengthen the fight against radon exposure. Radon exposure is the leading cause of non-smoking lung cancer. Senior leaders from the federal agencies are pledging to work together to create a national risk reduction plan for radon that will help save lives and create safer, healthier homes for all Americans. “Radon is a serious public health threat that leads to more than 21,000…

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WNCF   The World Health Organization and Environmental Protection Agency have announced a call to action for Americans to test their homes for Radon Gas, which has recently been identified as the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers in the U.S. The EPA has officially designated January 2011 to be National Radon Action Month in the United States. The press, local health departments, and the media are encouraged to help save lives in 2011 by promoting National Radon Action Month. Radon is a naturally-occurring, radioactive gas that seeps out of the ground and can enter homes and other buildings.…

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Tony Walter, Green Bay Press-Gazette The threat of radon makes this the season to be wary. The gas that can't be seen or smelled but is the second-leading cause of lung cancer — smoking is No. 1 — is a particular peril to this area at this time of year. "A lot has to do with the geology in this area," said Jerry Weyer of Radon Reduction Specialists in Manitowoc, referring to the traces of uranium in the regional bedrock that converts to radioactive radon gas as it decays. "But houses are shut tight at this time of year —…

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Thoron Abstracts.pdf The attached resource contains all of the abstracts from the special issue of Radon Protection Dosimetry Journal: International Workshop on Environmental Thoron and Related Issues. Please use the following contact to get the entire listing of the papers. Abstracts can be downloaded. You can request the reprint of the paper of your interest by contacting the corresponding author of the respective paper. http://rpd.oxfordjournals.org/content/141/4.toc

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Indianapolis Star One of the top five public health risks facing the United States is the air we breathe indoors -- in our homes, schools and businesses. It's where Americans spend about 90 percent of their time, and where levels of pollution could be two to five times higher than outdoor levels, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Indoor air pollutants -- such as dust mites, volatile organic compounds (known as VOCs), fibrous particulates, radon, mold and other contaminants -- can trigger short- and long-term health problems ranging from asthma to allergies. A strong indicator of poor indoor air quality…

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Casey Blake, Asheville Citizen-Times   ASHEVILLE — The idea of a silent killer in your home may be frightening, but what about a killer that's also odorless, intangible and invisible? Radon poisoning, the second-leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco use, is just that. With six of the eight counties with the highest radon levels in North Carolina nestled among the 18 western counties, area residents should be paying especially close attention to the elusive carcinogen. Radon is an odorless, invisible gas that, while harmless in the open air, can be dangerous when concentrated. Seeping out of the ground, it…

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Gayathri Vaidyanathan, Greenwire States are taking the lead with studying levels of radon in drinking water and air even as federal regulators lag, as a coincidence of geology and population density leaves some more at risk than others of suffering from the naturally occurring radioactive toxin. Nine states have guidelines for radon in drinking water, with New Jersey considering the most stringent levels, fourfold tighter than a limit proposed but never mandated by U.S. EPA in 1999. Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, Massachusetts and Wisconsin are the other states that have some guidance levels for the chemical,…

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Gary Culliton, Irish Medical Times Long-term exposure to residential radon is responsible for about 10 per cent of lung cancer deaths, according to experts in Canada. The combination of smoking and long-term radon exposure drastically increases the risk of lung cancer, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) recently stated. “Many Canadians are not aware of the risks from residential radon gas and what they can do to stay healthy,” noted Dr Jeff Turnbull, President of the CMA. “With winter approaching, physicians want to make sure their patients are aware of this potential health hazard.” The CMA, together with the Canadian Lung…

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