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Indianapolis Star One of the top five public health risks facing the United States is the air we breathe indoors -- in our homes, schools and businesses. It's where Americans spend about 90 percent of their time, and where levels of pollution could be two to five times higher than outdoor levels, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Indoor air pollutants -- such as dust mites, volatile organic compounds (known as VOCs), fibrous particulates, radon, mold and other contaminants -- can trigger short- and long-term health problems ranging from asthma to allergies. A strong indicator of poor indoor air quality…

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Casey Blake, Asheville Citizen-Times   ASHEVILLE — The idea of a silent killer in your home may be frightening, but what about a killer that's also odorless, intangible and invisible? Radon poisoning, the second-leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco use, is just that. With six of the eight counties with the highest radon levels in North Carolina nestled among the 18 western counties, area residents should be paying especially close attention to the elusive carcinogen. Radon is an odorless, invisible gas that, while harmless in the open air, can be dangerous when concentrated. Seeping out of the ground, it…

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Gayathri Vaidyanathan, Greenwire States are taking the lead with studying levels of radon in drinking water and air even as federal regulators lag, as a coincidence of geology and population density leaves some more at risk than others of suffering from the naturally occurring radioactive toxin. Nine states have guidelines for radon in drinking water, with New Jersey considering the most stringent levels, fourfold tighter than a limit proposed but never mandated by U.S. EPA in 1999. Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, Massachusetts and Wisconsin are the other states that have some guidance levels for the chemical,…

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Gary Culliton, Irish Medical Times Long-term exposure to residential radon is responsible for about 10 per cent of lung cancer deaths, according to experts in Canada. The combination of smoking and long-term radon exposure drastically increases the risk of lung cancer, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) recently stated. “Many Canadians are not aware of the risks from residential radon gas and what they can do to stay healthy,” noted Dr Jeff Turnbull, President of the CMA. “With winter approaching, physicians want to make sure their patients are aware of this potential health hazard.” The CMA, together with the Canadian Lung…

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Peggy Bagnoli Data_image.jpg Radon remains a leading cause of cancer. As we to ramp up action to reduce radon’s health risk, two areas we can all get smarter on are the collection and use of data. EPA, states, and several national and regional consortia all collect radon data. These programs have differing data needs, reporting requirements, thresholds, calculation protocols, and approaches to validation and verification. Despite these differences, the data collections share common purposes – improved tracking and understanding of radon exposure. Data is information and information is the programmatic foundation for effective radon risk reduction. People leading these programs…

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Matthew Beaudin, Telluride Daily Planet doc4cf9af6005ea0846693142.jpg The rise of the Atomic Age in the 1940s carried with it the promises of new energy and economic frontiers. It built towns in the Southwest and provided jobs. And then, the industry packed up and left, though it left much of itself behind in the form toxic waste and economically exhaled towns. It’s in the industry’s remains that Doug Brugge, a professor of public health and community medicine at Tufts University, toils. He’s done oral histories on mining’s impacts on the Navajo Nation and has followed that work up with studies on the…

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WCAX News Burlington, Vermont - According to the EPA, radon exposure in the home is responsible for 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year in America. Only smoking causes more lung cancer. Radon expert Paul Lyman appeared on The :30 to tell us more about the deadly gas. From new to drafty old homes and homes with or without basements, homes of all types can have a radon problem. How the home was built can be a factor on radon levels in homes. Aside from professional testing like Lyman offers and commercially available testing kits, the state also offers a free…

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NJ Today TRENTON — How old are the oldest rocks in New Jersey and where are they located? Perhaps these questions haven’t exactly kept you up at night, but geologists have been wondering about them for a long time. They know that the rocks in the mountains of North Jersey’s Highlands, remnants of ancient Appalachian Mountains that at one time rivaled the Rockies in might, are the oldest in New Jersey. They also accept that these rocks are about a billion years old. But they never knew precisely how old — until now. The New Jersey Geological Survey, within the…

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Yesterday, EPA convened leaders from federal agencies for an historic event to generate momentum and create new opportunities for radon risk reduction. This diverse group of leaders, including Department of Defense, DOD; Veterans Administration, VA; Department of Energy, DOE; U.S. General Services Administration, GSA; Department of Housing and Urban Development, HUD; Department of Health and Human Services, HHS; U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA; and U.S. Department of Interior, DOI, discussed ways the federal government can do more to reduce radon risk in the housing and buildings it owns or influences. Participants at the summit will reconvene…

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Mike Marshall, The Huntsville Times 9075748-small.jpg MADISON, Al. - 291 Dublin Circle in Madison looks like a place where there's little chance of danger. It's tucked in the curve on the north side of the street, a four-acre lot huddled among the maples. Tom and Faye Dickerson have lived here for almost 40 years. They've been here for most of their marriage, raising three children when Jack Clift's farm nudged up to their backyard. With the children gone, it's unnerving to the Dickersons that they raised a family in a house with such high levels of radon. "It's the second…

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